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Ohio Secretary of State Year in Review 2021

Ohio is the model for successful elections, election integrity and supporting entrepreneurship — 2021 was a big year for all three.

Below are 2021 highlights from Secretary LaRose and the Office of the Secretary of State.

OHIO ELECTIONS ARE A MODEL FOR THE NATION

SUCCESSFUL ELECTIONS IN 2021

In 2021, three elections were held over the course of the primary, special, and general elections. Across all three, 1,773 local issues were decided by the voters of Ohio. In November, early voting was up by 18 percent when compared to the November 2019 election – once again highlighting Ohioans’ trust in our state’s secure and accessible voting options. Relying upon the important collaborations with different groups and organizations across the state, poll worker recruitment was a vital emphasis of the November election and Ohioans responded. 33,504 Ohioans stepped up to serve their communities in the November election by serving as poll workers.

WINNING RECOGNITION FOR INNOVATIVE IDEAS

In March, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose was one of just four Secretaries of State to win a “Clearie” award sponsored by the U.S. Elections Assistance Commission. The award was presented for innovative voter outreach and poll worker recruitment programs that led to Ohio’s most successful election ever in 2020. Previous state records were shattered with 8+ million Ohioans registered and almost 6 million ballots cast producing an all-time high 74 percent statewide voter turnout. Then again in August, Secretary LaRose won an Innovators Award from the National Association of State Election Directors for Ohio’s Precinct Election Official Recruitment Program during the 2020 election.

DEFENDING OHIO’S ELECTIONS

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Leader Chuck Schumer have worked tirelessly to sidestep state sovereignty and federalize election administration. They failed in 2021, in no small part thanks to the effort by state leaders like Secretary LaRose who emphasized how states like Ohio shouldn’t be told how to run our successful elections. In June, Secretary LaRose applauded the state legislature’s wise decision to pass HCR 5, a resolution that urges the United States Congress to reject the federal takeover of state and locally-run elections, otherwise known as HR 1. LaRose stated, “Our success in 2020 was only possible because our nation’s founders had the wisdom to entrust elections to those who know the people. Over the years, we’ve built an elections system that has made our state both more secure and accessible. The result? An election with record voter turnout, the highest absentee ballot return rate in history, and a result that Ohioans trust.”

ENSURING ELECTION INTEGRITY

KEEPING VOTING ROLLS ACCURATE AND PREVENTING FRAUD

Accurate voter rolls are the backbone of Ohio’s secure elections system. In 2021, in accordance with both federal and state law, Secretary LaRose continued working with Ohio’s 88 county boards of elections to identify any registrations which have been abandoned, remove Ohioans from the voter rolls who have passed away, and catch any non-citizens who attempted to participate in the process. Thanks to Ohio’s proven system, Secretary LaRose was able to take action when 117 non-citizens were identified for potential election fraud violations and refer them to the Ohio Attorney General for potential prosecution. Integrity requires accountability, and that is happening in Ohio.

BOOSTING CYBER SECURITY AND ERASING VULNERABILITIES

Last year, Secretary LaRose became the first statewide elections official in the nation to implement a Vulnerability Disclosure Policy. The policy establishes procedures for outside researchers to inspect the Secretary of State’s website for vulnerabilities. In 2021, the Secretary exhibited the transparency his office has become known for by releasing its initial results. The issues that were identified were quickly resolved and did not negatively impact any users of the Ohio Secretary of State’s website. Additionally, none of the identified vulnerabilities impacted voting or related systems. By releasing these results, Ohio voters can have greater confidence in Ohio’s elections.

SHINING A LIGHT ON CAMPAIGN FINANCE

Election integrity requires accountability and transparency. In 2021, Secretary LaRose unveiled a new website that for the first time allows campaign finance reports for local campaign committees to be filed electronically with their respective county boards of elections. Previously, the only option for voters to obtain a report was to contact their county board of elections. By placing these reports online, voters will be better able to see where candidates are getting their money and how it’s being spent. By the end of the year, nearly 1,900 campaign committees were utilizing the website.

SUPPORTING OHIO ENTREPRENEURS

SPOTLIGHTING SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSES ACROSS THE STATE

Ohio’s entrepreneurial success has allowed for the opportunity to highlight several well-established and young businesses across Ohio. Emphasizing a different theme each month, Secretary LaRose made many visits to different Ohio businesses to learn how each one makes a special impact in their community. From outdoor activities to toy stores, Minority operated to Veteran entrepreneurs, Ohio is uniquely fortunate to have such successful, enterprising taking risks and creating businesses in Ohio.

RECORD HIGH BUSINESS STARTUPS

The Ohio Secretary of State’s office is the gateway to business creation in Ohio. In 2021, Ohio once again set a record for the number of new businesses created across the Buckeye State. As of the publication of this document and with December business filings still to be finalized, 181,586 new businesses have been created so far in 2021, surpassing last year’s record by eight percent. In April, Ohio surpassed 20,000 new businesses created for the first time ever. Ohio’s business-friendly climate and the array of resources available to Ohio entrepreneurs have helped Ohio maintain its economic momentum throughout 2021.

WORKING TO REMOVE BARRIERS FOR MINORITY, WOMEN, AND VETERAN OWNED BUSINESSES

In 2021, Secretary LaRose continued his efforts to reduce the red tape that makes it more difficult for minority, veteran, and women owned businesses to succeed. Thanks in large part to recommendations made by participants attending Minority Business Roundtables hosted by the Secretary of State’s office, LaRose has been a champion of new legislation which removes much of the unnecessary paperwork when minority, women and veteran entrepreneurs seek enterprise certification in Ohio.

Additional Meetings

This week, Secretary LaRose administered the oath of office to several local elected officials throughout Ohio. Mansfield City Councilwoman Stephanie Zader, Ashland Mayor Matt Miller, Aurora Mayor Anne Womer Benjamin invited the Secretary to be a part of their swearing in programs.

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Secretary LaRose administering the oath of office for Mansfield City Councilwoman Stephanie Zader.

Secretary LaRose administers the oath of office for Stephanie Zader

Secretary LaRose administering the oath of office for Ashland Mayor Matt Miller.

Secretary LaRose administers the oath of office for Anne Womer Benjamin

Secretary LaRose administering the oath of office for Aurora Mayor Anne Womer Benjamin.

Secretary LaRose administers the oath of office for Brad Duguay

Secretary LaRose administering the oath of office for Brad Duguay, Aurora City Council Ward One

Secretary LaRose administers the oath of office for Reva Barner

Secretary LaRose administering the oath of office for Reva Barner, Aurora City Council Ward Three

Secretary LaRose administers the oath of office for Kathi Grandillo

Secretary LaRose administering the oath of office for Kathi Grandillo, Aurora City Council Ward Five

Secretary LaRose administers the oath of office for Peter French

Secretary LaRose administering the oath of office for Peter French, Aurora City Council At-Large

In Case You Missed It

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The Marietta Times: Voting still makes a difference

Think your vote doesn’t matter, or that there’s no reason to participate in the election process as long as others remain involved? Numbers from Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose’s office indicate you may need to think again.

Now that all the dust has settled and all canvasses completed, results of last Nov. 2’s general election included a whopping 18 tied races.

Those races, according to LaRose, had to be determined by coin flip or some other similar method.

Read more here.

Media Contact

Rob Nichols
[email protected]
330.760.7582